Radiologic Technology
Entrance Exam

Monday, October 21

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Radiologic Technology

2,005 Hours
Diploma Program
Day (16 months)

HEGIS Code 5207.00
Radiologic Technologies (X-Ray)
Levittown Campus Only

Associate Degree or Higher Required

Hunter Business School’s Radiologic Technology training program provides the graduate with the knowledge, skills, training, and attitudes needed to function as a radiologic technologist.

The radiologic technologist uses radiation to produce images of various parts of the body to aid in the detection of injury or disease. Other terms used for this profession include x-ray technician and x-ray technologist.

The Radiologic Technology diploma program is 2,005 hours in length, built across four semesters, and takes 16 months to complete.

It begins by introducing Radiologic Technology students to the fundamentals of radiologic technology. Anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, radiographic procedures, and an immediate introduction to the clinical arena set the foundation for the program. Patient care, radiation protection, image analysis, and pathology are incorporated into the overall educational experience.

Radiologic Technology Graduates Are Prepared

to pass The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists® exam and become licensed in New York State

As the Radiologic Technology diploma program progresses, there are learning modules that expose Hunter Business School students to a myriad of opportunities that they may pursue with their new profession. This includes a Radiologic Technology course that highlights medical imaging pathways, as well as Radiologic Technology courses in the principles and fundamentals of mammography and cross-sectional anatomy, as seen in magnetic resonance and computed tomography images. The focus is primarily on the identification of normal anatomy in two- and three-dimensional planes.

Comprehensive clinical experiences are offered to supplement these classroom discussions. Ethics in the medical imaging profession are also explored. Graduates of Hunter Business School’s Radiologic Technology diploma program are eligible to sit for the exam given by The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists® (ARRT). This examination satisfies New York State licensing requirements.

No Associate Degree?

If you would like to get started in the health care field but don’t have an associate degree, Hunter offers many other program options. To determine the best choice for you, explore our website and contact the Admissions department.

Hunter Program Descriptions

Mission Statement

The mission of Hunter Business School’s Radiologic Technology program is to provide a quality and comprehensive educational experience that program graduates qualified professionals who have acquired the knowledge, skills, abilities, and behaviors necessary to function successfully as entry-level radiographers certified by The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists® (ARRT) in New York State and provide quality radiographic care in the health care community.

Job Titles for Graduates of the Radiologic Technology Diploma Program

The following list includes, but is not limited to, many of the most common job titles for which this program prepares Radiologic Technology training program students and requires the use of the skills learned as a predominant component of the job.

  • Chief Technologist
  • X-Ray Chief Technologist
  • Limited Radiology Technologist
  • Radiologic Technologist
  • Radiology Technologist
  • Radiology Tech
  • Registered Radiographer
  • X-Ray Technologist
  • X-Ray Tech

Program Goals and Graduate Competencies

The Radiologic Technology training program prepares qualified graduates to successfully pass the national registry examination administered by The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists® (ARRT). The Radiologic Technology training program attains its mission through the success of its graduates who will achieve these program goals.

  1. Demonstrate clinical competence by performing a full range of radiologic procedures on all patient populations.
  2. Professionally utilize verbal, nonverbal, and written communication in patient care intervention and professional relationships.
  3. Demonstrate professional growth and development by practicing the profession’s code of ethics and comply with the profession’s scope of practice.
  4. Demonstrate critical thinking and problem-solving skills in the performance of radiographic procedures.

Radiologic Technology Program Learning Outcomes

The Radiologic Technology training program attains its program goals through the success of its students who, by the end of the program, will have achieved these student learning outcomes and will be able to perform these functions.

  • Apply positioning skills
  • Select technical factors
  • Utilize radiation protection
  • Demonstrate written communication skills
  • Demonstrate oral communication skills
  • Adapt standard procedures for nonroutine patients
  • Critique images to determine diagnostic quality
  • Demonstrate professionalism in the clinical setting
  • Understand and demonstrate work ethics
  • Provide quality patient care
  • Understand the value of lifelong learning

Semester I

    • Introduction to Radiography

      RAD101 (45 hours)

      This course provides an overview of the field of radiologic technology, including the organization of medical practice and the unique place imaging holds in the medical field. Radiologic Technology program students explore the history of the medical imaging field and the critical role medical imaging plays in the health care arena.

      Included are exercises that give students hands-on practice in the proper mechanics of transferring patients physically from stretchers and wheelchairs to the x-ray table and back. Cultural competency is explained. Safety and legal responsibilities of interacting with patients are focuses of study. Corequisites: RAD102 through RAD106

    • Radiographic Procedures with Lab I

      RAD102 (60 hours)

      Radiographic Procedures with Lab I focuses on radiographic procedures as they relate to the skeletal system. Topics include positioning, exposure factors, film evaluation, and related anatomy of the chest, abdomen, upper and lower extremities, and shoulder and pelvic girdles. Proper marker placement and collimation are emphasized.

      This Radiologic Technology course is also a simulated, hands-on class demonstrating and reinforcing anatomical positioning and the clinical applications of anatomy taught in Anatomy and Physiology. Corequisites: RAD101 and RAD103 through RAD106

    • Radiographic Physics and Principles

      RAD103 (45 hours)

      In this Radiologic Technology course, students review electromagnetic radiation and electricity in order to operate radiographic equipment in a safe manner. Application of physics principles in the production of x-rays and the responsibility of producing quality radiographs with the lowest possible exposure to patients are emphasized. Corequisites: RAD101, RAD102, RAD104 through RAD106

    • Anatomy and Physiology

      RAD104 (90 hours)

      This Radiologic Technology class provides an in-depth study of human anatomy and physiology. The human body, the chemistry of life, and all systems are covered. Each of the systems is introduced with a general overview and then broken down to examine how they work, beginning at the cellular level. Practical exercises to demonstrate key concepts are utilized. Corequisites: RAD101 through RAD103, RAD105, RAD106

    • Medical Terminology

      RAD105 (45 hours)

      This course introduces students to medical terminology through a combination of visually reinforced learning and lecture. Basic word structure, prefixes, suffixes, organization of the body, and body systems are discussed. Medical specialists and case reports are also examined. Corequisites: RAD101 through RAD104,
      RAD106

    • Clinical Practicum I

      RAD106 (216 hours)

      In Clinical Practicum I, Radiologic Technology training program students observe the basic operation of a radiologic technology department, while interacting with a multidisciplinary team involved in providing treatment and care. Radiologic Technology training program students are introduced to positioning, terminology, equipment, and techniques used for producing diagnostic images. Learning is achieved in direct patient care through instruction, demonstration, and direct supervision. Prerequisites: RAD101 through RAD105

Semester II

    • Radiographic Image Analysis

      RAD201 (45 hours)

      This Radiologic Technology course provides a basis for analyzing radiographic images. Included are the importance of optimal imaging standards, analyzing problem solving techniques for image evaluation, and factors that can affect image quality. A class project consisting of an essay with a presentation is assigned to reinforce the material discussed. Prerequisite: RAD101

    • Radiographic Procedures with Lab II

      RAD202 (60 hours)

      Radiographic Procedures with Lab II focuses on radiographic procedures, positioning, exposure factors, film evaluation, and related anatomy of the thorax and sternum. Also covered are advanced projections of the upper and lower extremities, pelvis and hip, and the entire spinal column. Proper marker placement and collimation are emphasized.

      The Radiologic Technology course includes simulated, hands-on demonstrations and reinforcement of anatomical positioning and its clinical applications of anatomy that are taught in Anatomy and Physiology. Prerequisite: RAD102

    • Cross-Sectional Anatomy for CT/MR

      RAD203 (75 hours)

      In this Radiologic Technology class, a review of gross anatomy of the entire body is presented. Detailed study of anatomical structures is conducted systemically for location, relationship to other structures, and function.

      Anatomical structures are located and identified in axial, sagittal, coronal, and oblique planes. Illustrations and anatomy images are compared with magnetic resonance and computed tomography images in the same imaging planes and at the same level, when applicable. Prerequisite: RAD104

    • Radiation Biology and Patient Protection

      RAD204 (60 hours)

      This Radiologic Technology course covers the principles of cell response to radiation. Topics covered include the development of radiation science, effects of whole body exposure, and radiation protection dosage guidelines. Prerequisite: RAD103

    • Patient Care in Radiologic Technology

      RAD205 (45 hours)

      This Radiologic Technology course highlights the responsibilities of caring for patients who require medical imaging procedures. How to manage compromised patients—including mobile examinations, medical emergencies, and contrast exams—is an area of focus. The importance of sterility is discussed.

      Information is presented as to how to behave in an emergency or code situation. The course includes a review of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention precautions, and pharmacology and the principles of drug administration are examined. Corequisites: RAD101 through RAD104, RAD106

    • Clinical Practicum II

      RAD206 (216 hours)

      In Clinical Practicum II, Radiologic Technology training program students observe the basic operation of a radiologic technology department while interacting with a multidisciplinary team involved in providing treatment and care.

      Radiologic Technology training program students are introduced to positioning, terminology, equipment, and techniques used for producing diagnostic images. Learning is achieved in direct patient care through instruction, demonstration, and direct supervision. Prerequisite: RAD106

Semester III

    • Radiographic Quality Management and Quality Control

      RAD301 (45 hours)

      This Radiologic Technology course is designed to highlight quality control and quality management in the radiology department. Continuous quality improvement is emphasized in radiographic, fluoroscopic, and mobile equipment requirements and design. Repeat analysis and outcomes assessments are included. Prerequisite: RAD201

    • Radiographic Procedures with Lab III

      RAD302 (60 hours)

      Radiographic Procedures with Lab III focuses on radiographic procedures as they relate to the skeletal system. Topics include positioning, exposure factors, film evaluation, and related anatomy imaging of the skull, facial bones, sinuses, mandible/temporomandibular joint, zygomatic arches, nasal bones, and orbits.

      Gastrointestinal and urological procedures are also studied. Proper marker placement and collimation are emphasized. This course will also be a simulated, hands-on class demonstrating and reinforcing anatomical positioning and its clinical applications of anatomy taught in Anatomy and Physiology. Prerequisite: RAD202

    • Digital Radiography

      RAD303 (45 hours)

      This Radiologic Technology course imparts an understanding of the components, principles, and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving, and retrieval are discussed, as well as the principles of digital system quality assurance. Prerequisite: RAD103

    • Ethics and Legal Implications in Radiologic Technology

      RAD304 (45 hours)

      Radiologic Technology students learn the critical role that ethics plays in the medical imaging arena. Legal implications of working with patients and sensitive, protected information will also be a focus. The information that is foundational for HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) and the reasons behind the creation of the laws intended to protect the rights of patients are discussed in depth. Prerequisite: None

    • Clinical Practicum III

      RAD305 (232 hours)

      Clinical Practicum III focuses on radiographic procedures as they relate to the skeletal system. Topics include positioning, exposure factors, film evaluation, and related anatomy of the cranium, facial bones, paranasal sinuses, biliary tract, and upper and lower gastrointestinal systems. Prerequisite: RAD206

Semester IV

    • Specialization in Radiologic Technology

      RAD401 (45 hours)

      This survey course is designed to introduce students to specializations that exist in the imaging field. Computed tomography, mammography, magnetic resonance imaging, cardiovascular technology, ultrasound, fluoroscopy, mobile radiography, radiographic tomography, bone densitometry, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, dosimetry, and forensics and mammographic modalities are reviewed. Prerequisites: RAD101, RAD303

    • Radiographic Procedures with Lab IV

      RAD402 (60 hours)

      This Radiologic Technology course focuses on special circumstances in radiography, including trauma, surgery, pediatrics, and various special procedures and how they relate to patients, radiation protection, and imaging.

      This Radiologic Technology course also features a simulated, hands-on class demonstrating and reinforcing anatomical positioning in the clinical application as it pertains to emergency and surgical imaging and the imaging of nonroutine procedures. Proper marker placement and collimation are emphasized. Prerequisite: RAD302

    • Principles and Fundamentals of Mammography

      RAD403 (45 hours)

      This Radiologic Technology course provides an overview of the field of mammography, including the history of this imaging modality and the unique place mammography holds in the medical field. Radiologic Technology training program students explore the history of mammography and the critical role it plays in the health care arena. Cultural competency is explained. Safety and legal responsibilities of interacting with patients is a focus of study. Prerequisite: RAD103

    • Pathology

      RAD404 (45 hours)

      Radiologic Technology students are introduced to the basic terms related to pathology and manifestations of pathological conditions, including their relevance to radiologic procedures and the radiographic appearance of disease.

      During this course, students learn about imaging procedures used in diagnosing diseases, the various systemic classifications of disease in terms of etiology and types, common sites, complications, and their prognoses. Prerequisite: RAD103

    • Clinical Practicum IV

      RAD405 (336 hours)

      Clinical Practicum IV focuses on radiographic procedures as they relate to the skeletal system. Topics include positioning, exposure factors, film evaluation, and related anatomy of the procedures associated with trauma, mobile, and surgical radiography, pediatric radiography, and interventional procedures. Prerequisite: RAD305

    • Registry Review

      RAD406 (45 hours)

      Registry Review includes lectures and demonstrations of various topics that comprehensively review all in-class and clinical site areas of study that have been covered throughout the program. The intent is to prepare Radiologic Technology students to be successful in passing The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists® exam and become fully licensed in New York State.

      There is also a strong focus on career planning and avenues that are available in the medical imaging field beyond basic registration and licensing. Prerequisites: RAD101 through RAD405